#DOAG2014 bits of info for DBAs

Just wanted to share some pieces of information from the recent DOAG annual conference that you may find interesting.

From Mike Dietrich’s presentation about Database Upgrade:

Mike Dietrich

Database Replay is extremely useful to predict after-upgrade performance on a test system,

especially we can record the production load on 10g even.

From Carsten Czarski’s talk about XML DB:

Carsten Czarski

With 12c, XML DB is mandatory and it provides an easy way to upload BLOBs via ftp into the database.

From Ulrike Schwinn’s talk about the Resource Manager I took away that

The resource manager becomes more and more popular and important, especially for Multitenant

– something Hans Forbrich reinforced later on.

Particularly I liked way she presented later on about ADO: Very many live demonstrations – that’s how I try to do my own presentations also 🙂

Ulrike Schwinn

Frank Schneede did a great job debunking Exadata myths. For example,

You don’t need to have all cores enabled with Exadata X4 in order to save license cost. That’s called Capacity on Demand.

Frank Schneede

If I should name one presentation that was most useful for me, it’ll be probably Frank’s.

Markus Michalewicz delivered an excellent talk as expected about RAC cache fusion:

Markus Michalewicz

Two important messages:

RAC scales well (far) beyond three nodes because there are never more than three nodes involved for cache fusion intercommunication.

And Multitenant and RAC are a perfect fit.

One Data Guard snippet out of Larry Carpenter’s talk about Global Data Services (GDS):

GDS makes it possible to automate the failover of the Real-Time Query service to the primary in case the physical standby has an outage.

Larry Carpenter

Hans Forbrich talked about Multitenant. He showed great presentation skills and although I knew the technical details before, the way he highlighted certain aspects was still very helpful for me.

Hans Forbrich

One key message was that

Multitenant is here to stay.

DBAs should learn about it and become familiar with it as soon as possible,

because sooner than later it will have to be administered in production!

  1. Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: